Frame Analysis An Essay On The Organization Of Experience

Contemporary Sociology

Description:Contemporary Sociology (CS) publishes reviews and critical discussions of recent works in sociology and in related disciplines which merit the attention of sociologists. Since not all sociological publications can be reviewed, a selection is made to reflect important trends and issues in the field. Please note that CS does not accept unsolicited reviews.

Coverage: 1972-2015 (Vol. 1, No. 1 - Vol. 44, No. 6)

Moving Wall: 2 years (What is the moving wall?)

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For example, if the current year is 2008 and a journal has a 5 year moving wall, articles from the year 2002 are available.

Terms Related to the Moving Wall
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ISSN: 00943061

EISSN: 19398638

Subjects: Sociology, Social Sciences

Collections: Arts & Sciences I Collection, JSTOR Essential Collection

Synopsis:

Erving Goffman will influence the thinking and perceptions of generations to come. In Frame Analysis, the brilliant theorist writes about the ways in which people determine their answers to the questions “What is going on here?” and “Under what circumstances do we think things are real?”

Review:

“Frame Analysis is a rich, full, exceedingly complex book based on familiar data: clippings, cartoons, novels, vignettes from the cinema and legitimate stage. The argument rests on distinctions, on the one hand, between what is taken to be real from the perspective of the observer in any situation and actual occurrence and, on the other, between fabrication, internal and sometimes collusive misinterpretation of a situation by one person for another, and simple errors in framing and self-induced alterations.”—American Journal of Sociology

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