Glogster Book Review Assignment High School

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Just like reading an interactive ebook is more engaging than reading a print textbook, creating a digital book is a lot more fun than writing a typical report or essay. But more important than making learning fun, creating an interactive ebook gives students who struggle with writing a better tool for sharing their ideas and demonstrating knowledge.

Currey Ingram Academy is a K-12 college preparatory school for students with learning differences. Many of our students struggle with written expression. Dyslexia, language processing deficits, and fine motor delays can make it challenging for a child to produce a quality written product. Students with ADHD often lack the focus for completing a major assignment. Using the right tech tool, our students can build upon their strengths to produce amazing, creative works. Because digital books give students a variety of options for sharing information, our students are highly successful when using this technology.

Here are four ways you can use digital book creation with your students:

1. Go beyond creative writing.

Though most ebook-creation platforms focus on narrative writing, most of my digital book projects are nonfiction texts. Last year, I helped second-graders write an alphabet book about Thanksgiving. Using Book Creator, each student created a page for one letter ("B is for Bread") with an image and a factual sentence about the topic. We then compiled the pages into one ebook to share with parents and other classes.

2. Share knowledge.

Digital books are an excellent assessment tool for all ages. In addition to text, students can include images, video, and audio clips. My fourth-grade students made StoryJumper ebooks about famous explorers as a culminating activity for their exploration unit. The final products are more than a project grade; the books are shared with future classes as instructional texts.

3. Create and listen with audio-integrated books.

Seventh-grade students wrote creative stories about the day aliens visited our school. Then they turned their stories into original picture books using My Story Book Creator. In addition to illustrating the books by hand (stylus), the students recorded themselves reading the text aloud in rehearsed, dramatic voices. The ebooks were shared with elementary students who enjoyed listening to books that otherwise may have been too difficult for them to read independently.

4. Don't forget the multimedia.

Many students who lack the ability or focus to compose long written passages may really shine by incorporating images and video. When given an assignment to use Book Creator to create an autobiography, one of my students with ADHD produced a very creative story told almost exclusively through video clips embedded in the book. The videos conveyed her personality in a way written language could not.

If you aren't sure where to start, check out some of my favorite tools for digital book creation:

  • My Story Book Creator:Make easy-to-share, colorful picture books; the audio narration is my favorite feature. It's designed for elementary grades, but no one is ever too old to illustrate a storybook! All ages.
  • Book Creator: Create professional-looking books with a wide variety of media options. It's designed for older students but simple enough for young students. It's also easy to merge pages from multiple devices. All ages.
  • Creative Book Builder: It's one of the more expensive apps, but it's very versatile. Grades 6-12.
  • iBooks Author​: Create professional, beautiful ebooks. iBooks Author supports dictation and text-to-speech, a useful accommodation for many students. Grades 6-12.
  • StoryJumper: It's easy to access and manage student accounts and share the final product. There's an extensive library of clip art/stickers, but it doesn’t support video or audio. Grades K-8.
  • VoiceThread: Not an ebook platform, but I've used it for making collaborative book-like projects. Students can contribute content in a multitude of formats: images, voice, video, and text. Grades K-12.

And for a shorter assignment, or if you don't have access to a digital-book-creation platform, try making multimedia-enriched posters. Several excellent websites, such as Glogster and Thinglink​, can help in creating interactive digital posters.


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Lesson Plan

Book Report Alternative: Glog That Book!

 

Grades5 – 8
Lesson Plan TypeStandard Lesson
Estimated TimeFive 50-minute sessions
Lesson Author

Publisher

 

Preview

OVERVIEW

In this lesson, students review the elements of fiction.  They identify and share these components by creating unique glogs, which are interactive multimedia posters, through Glogster EDU. This activity offers an alternative to the traditional book report as well as an opportunity for students to share their glogs with their classmates, who will have suggestions of what they might enjoy reading next from viewing each other's glogs.

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FEATURED RESOURCES

  • Book Report Glog:  Students use this planning sheet to think through the elements of their glog before they work on computers.
  • Glogster EDU: Students' glogs will be created on this website.

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FROM THEORY TO PRACTICE

Without a doubt, all students should be able to read and communicate effectively with others what they have read.  Nolan explains that using technology in the classroom offers opportunities for developing necessary skills such as reading, writing, communicating, and questioning. She writes, “technology creates opportunities for students to explore, try different tactics, and exercise increments of freedom.”

In this lesson, technology meshes with the book report to provide students a creative opportunity.  It addresses the problem that Mitchell identifies:  “Students tire of responding to novels in the same ways.  They want new ways to think about a piece of literature and new ways to dig into it.”

Further Reading

Nolan, Sara.  “How Technology Fuels Learning.” MindShift Blog, KQED.org. September 16,2011.

Mitchell, Diana. "Fifty Alternatives to the Book Report." English Journal 87.1 (January 1998): 92-95.

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Standards

NCTE/IRA NATIONAL STANDARDS FOR THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS

1.

Students read a wide range of print and nonprint texts to build an understanding of texts, of themselves, and of the cultures of the United States and the world; to acquire new information; to respond to the needs and demands of society and the workplace; and for personal fulfillment. Among these texts are fiction and nonfiction, classic and contemporary works.

 

2.

Students read a wide range of literature from many periods in many genres to build an understanding of the many dimensions (e.g., philosophical, ethical, aesthetic) of human experience.

 

3.

Students apply a wide range of strategies to comprehend, interpret, evaluate, and appreciate texts. They draw on their prior experience, their interactions with other readers and writers, their knowledge of word meaning and of other texts, their word identification strategies, and their understanding of textual features (e.g., sound-letter correspondence, sentence structure, context, graphics).

 

6.

Students apply knowledge of language structure, language conventions (e.g., spelling and punctuation), media techniques, figurative language, and genre to create, critique, and discuss print and nonprint texts.

 

8.

Students use a variety of technological and information resources (e.g., libraries, databases, computer networks, video) to gather and synthesize information and to create and communicate knowledge.

 

11.

Students participate as knowledgeable, reflective, creative, and critical members of a variety of literacy communities.

 

12.

Students use spoken, written, and visual language to accomplish their own purposes (e.g., for learning, enjoyment, persuasion, and the exchange of information).

 

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Resources & Preparation

MATERIALS AND TECHNOLOGY

  • Computers with Internet capabilities
  • LCD projector, overhead projector, and/or interactive whiteboard

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PRINTOUTS

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WEBSITES

  • Glogster EDU

    This website provides educators the software to create glogs. For a small yearly charge, a teacher can receive fifty accounts.  Additionally, it offers educators two yearly schoolwide subscription levels that allows for extra features that are not used in this project but would be useful in other projects.

  • Free Sound Effects and Royalty Free Sound Effects

    This site offers several sound effects that can be downloaded without cost.

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PREPARATION

  1. Before this lesson, have students read a fiction book independently.
  2. Ask students to bring copies of their books that will be the focus of their glogs to class for reference.
  3. Review the definitions of the literary terms used in the glog:  protagonist setting, conflict, resolution, theme, climax, point of view, characterization, and genre.
  4. Using examples from stories students have previously read together, apply the literary terms.
  5. Reserve time in your school’s computer lab for use while students are creating their glogs.
  6. Sign up for an account at Glogster EDUand request the number of student accounts you need.  You can have up to fifty accounts.  Glogster will generate user names and passwords for your student accounts.  Assign each student an account.
  7. Make copies of Glog It!, Book Report Glog, and Book Report Glog Rubric (one for each student).
  8. Become familiar with Glogster.  Practice the steps of making a glog using Glog It!.  Create a sample glog using a story that students have read together previously. You can find samples of other book report glogs under Categories at Glogster EDU under English and Language Arts or Reading.
  9. Find sources for sound and video that are appropriate for your class.

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Instructional Plan

STUDENT OBJECTIVES

Students will:

  • identify elements of fiction.
  • analyze a fiction book.
  • communicate literary terms in visual and written form by producing a glog.
  • celebrate reading by sharing their glogs with their classmates.

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Session One: Introducing the Project

  1. Show the sample glog of the story that students have previously read together.
  2. Go through the rubric and grade the sample glog as a class. Discuss how the two quotes reflect the essence of the story.  Discuss how the hyperlinks expand topics that are in the book, for example, links to author’s homepage or topics covered in the book.
  3. Give each student the printout Book Report Glog.
  4. Assign students to complete the printout before the next session.

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Sessions Two through Four: Creating the Glog

  1. Check the students have completed the Book Report Glog.
  2. Model each step of creating a glog using the printout Glog It!.
  3. Provide each student with his/her username and password.  When the student signs in for the first time, the student will be asked to type in his/her name.  Instruct the students to do so because then you will be able to see on your teacher dashboard the students by name and username.
  4. Allow students time to work on their glogs.  While students work, work with students individually on some or all of the following.
    • Check on their accuracy of use of literary terms and help students revise where needed.
    • Question students about which quotes they have selected from their books and why these quotes reflect the essence of the book.
    • Ask students what hyperlinks they have selected and why their links are good, credible websites.
    • Also, ask students how the sounds, images, and videos they have chosen relate to their books so that the students make the glogs truly reflect their books.
  5. Encourage students to work on their glogs from any computer (home or public library, for example) since this is an Internet-based program.

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Session Five: Celebrating and Sharing

  1. Celebrate the joy of reading by having each student share his/her glog with the class.  From the teacher’s dashboard in Glogster, each student’s glog can be easily accessed so that each student does not have to log-in before each presentation.
  2. As students present their glogs, students can use the rubric to assess their peers and/or the teacher can use this time to assess the glog using the rubric.

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EXTENSIONS

  • Establish a class wiki and post links to the glogs to the wiki.  Publish your classroom wiki to the community, so the audience for your student is larger.
  • Add other literary terms to the glog, such as plot, antagonist, foreshadowing, etc.

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STUDENT ASSESSMENT/REFLECTIONS

  • Before students work on their glogs, review each student’s completed Book Report Glog checklist.
  • During each session, observe and note the students’ time on task as this is one of the categories on the rubric.  Using the Book Report Glog Rubric, evaluate each student’s completed glog.  Offer feed back to the students on their glogs.
  • Have students present their glogs to the class.  Question students about their choices of quotes, pictures, videos, and sounds to show the essence of their books.  Use the rubric to assess students' final projects.

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Related Resources

LESSON PLANS

Grades   4 – 12  |  Lesson Plan  |  Standard Lesson

Book Report Alternative: Creating Reading Excitement with Book Trailers

In this alternative to the traditional book report, students create book trailers using Microsoft Photo Story 3, a free downloadable software program for digital storytelling.

 

Grades   6 – 8  |  Lesson Plan  |  Standard Lesson

Book Report Alternative: Character and Author Business Cards

Students respond to a book they have read by thinking symbolically to create a business card for one of the characters.

 

Grades   6 – 8  |  Lesson Plan  |  Standard Lesson

Using Mobile Devices to Illustrate Literary Devices

Using mobile devices, students capture images to represent literary devices. Students then reflect on why their images depict the literary devices.

 

Grades   6 – 8  |  Lesson Plan  |  Standard Lesson

Book Report Alternative: Comic Strips and Cartoon Squares

Students must think critically to create comic strips highlighting six important scenes from a book they have read.

 

Grades   9 – 12  |  Lesson Plan  |  Standard Lesson

Book Report Alternative: Characters for Hire! Studying Character in Drama

In this alternative to the traditional book report, students respond to a play they have read by creating a resume for one of its characters.

 

Grades   3 – 5  |  Lesson Plan  |  Standard Lesson

Book Report Alternative: Examining Story Elements Using Story Map Comic Strips

Comic frames are traditionally used to illustrate a story in a short, concise format. In this lesson, students use a six-paneled comic strip frame to create a story map, summarizing a book or story that they've read. Each panel retells a particular detail or explains a literary element (such as setting or character) from the story.

 

Grades   6 – 8  |  Lesson Plan  |  Standard Lesson

Book Report Alternative: Creating Careers for Characters

Students select a job listing for a character in a book they have read, then create a resume and application letter for that character.

 

Grades   3 – 5  |  Lesson Plan  |  Standard Lesson

Book Report Alternative: Writing Resumes for Characters in Historical Fiction

Students write resumes for historical fiction characters. They first explore help wanted ads to see what employers want, and then draft resumes for the characters they've chosen.

 

Grades   6 – 8  |  Lesson Plan  |  Standard Lesson

Book Report Alternative: A Character's Letter to the Editor

Students write a persuasive letter to the editor of a newspaper from a selected fictional character's perspective, focusing on a specific issue or situation explored in the novel.

 

Grades   6 – 8  |  Lesson Plan  |  Standard Lesson

Book Report Alternative: Creating a Childhood for a Character

Students explore familiar literary characters, usually first encountered as adults, but whose childhood stories are only told later. Students then create childhoods for adult characters from books of their choice.

 

Grades   3 – 5  |  Lesson Plan  |  Standard Lesson

Book Report Alternative: Creating a New Book Cover

Students explore book covers of a variety of books then create a new cover for a book they have read.

 

Grades   6 – 8  |  Lesson Plan  |  Standard Lesson

Book Report Alternative: Hooking a Reader with a Book Cover

Students select a book to read based only on its cover art. After reading the book, they use an interactive tool to create a new cover for it.

 

Grades   5 – 8  |  Lesson Plan  |  Standard Lesson

Glogging About Natural Disasters

After researching various natural disasters, students share their findings with each other using glogs, or through poster presentations.

 

Grades   6 – 8  |  Lesson Plan  |  Standard Lesson

Book Report Alternative: Summary, Symbol, and Analysis in Bookmarks

Students make bookmarks on computers and share their ideas with other readers at their school, while practicing summarizing, recognizing symbols, and writing reviews—all for an authentic audience.

 

Grades   6 – 10  |  Lesson Plan  |  Standard Lesson

"Licensed" to Drive: Old West Figures

This lesson invites students to create a "Driver's License" for characters that have made a contribution to western expansion in the United States.

 

Grades   3 – 5  |  Lesson Plan  |  Standard Lesson

Book Report Alternative: The Elements of Fiction

Students identify the elements of fiction in a book they have read and share summaries of them by writing and illustrating their own mini-book.

 

Grades   6 – 12  |  Lesson Plan  |  Standard Lesson

Book Report Alternative: Rewind the Plot!

In this alternative to the traditional book report, students report on their novel choices by rewinding the plot.

 

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STRATEGY GUIDES

Grades   3 – 12  |  Strategy Guide

Using Glogster to Support Multimodal Literacy

Glogster, a Web 2.0 tool, supports development of students' multimodal literacy skills. This guide outlines techniques for critical evaluation and creation of multimodal texts.

 

Grades   3 – 12  |  Strategy Guide

Teaching With Glogster: Using Virtual Posters in the Classroom

Why stop at paper and markers? With Glogster, a free, web-based tool, students can develop virtual posters including audio, video, text, hyperlinks, and images, and share their creations electronically.

 

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PROFESSIONAL LIBRARY

Grades   8 – 12  |  Professional Library  |  Journal

Alternative Book Reports

This article describes different ways that students can report on books they have read other than the traditional "book report."

 

Grades   8 – 12  |  Professional Library  |  Journal

Fifty Alternatives to the Book Report

Offers 50 diverse suggestions intended to offer students new ways to think about a piece of literature, new directions to explore, and ways to respond with greater depth to the books they read.

 

 

COMMUNITY STORIES

Empowering Students and Teachers with RWT

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Comments

Amy Mancini-Marshall

December 05, 2013

Thank you for this wonderful lesson plan! I am using it with my 6th grade students enrolled in Tier II RTI. They are able to show what they know about literary terms in a fun and interactive way. Thank you for the tremendous handouts and tutorials. This has been their favorite project so far this year!

 

Lisa Casey

January 21, 2013

I used your structure and rubrics to plan a glog book review for my fifth graders here in Jamestown RI. I think this is an excellent piece of work. I am posting the student glogs to a wiki, and am hoping that I will have other schools joining in this project.

 

Lisa Casey

October 14, 2012

Excellent work! I am going to use this lesson, a bit modified, for my 5th grade Student Learning Objectives. Last year we used Glogster for our 4th grade state reports and the kids just got so excited about the media aspect, it made what was "humdrum" to them, new and exciting. I want to go a step further and post their work on a wiki and invite others to join us. Haven't done it yet, I need to teach searching skills so they can embed connected media with their report, reteach Glogster (it changed a bit with it's Next-Gen glog) but I'll let you know how it comes out. Thanks for the inspiration!!

 

Paul McKenzie

April 19, 2012

Absolutely awesome lesson plan. Nicely done.

 

 

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